Idiopathic Scoliosis

This article is about Idiopathic Scoliosis and also about very efficient exercises what can be a part of the therapy and you can do simply every day at home.


What is Idiopathic Scoliosis?

Scoliosis (pronounced sko-lee-o-sis) is a three-dimensional abnormality that occurs when the spine becomes rotated and curved sideways.

Most often this condition has no known cause, in which case it is called idiopathic scoliosis.

While the cause is unknown, idiopathic scoliosis does tend to run in families. The specific genes involved have not all been identified yet, and there could be factors beyond genetics as well.

Some people mistakenly think that carrying heavy book bags or sleeping on the side could cause scoliosis, but that is not the case.

About 3% of the population is estimated to have idiopathic scoliosis.

Idiopathic was a term introduced by Kleinberg (1922) and is applied to all clients in which it is not possible to find a specific disease causing the curve.  In fact, this is the case 80% of the time, where it appears in apparently healthy children.

So Idiopathic Scoliosis (IS) is of unknown origin and is probably due to several causes.  It can progress in relation to multiple factors during any rapid period of growth, or later in life.

IS is named in relation to the age at which it was diagnosed.  ‘Infantile IS’ is for children less than 3 years of age, ‘Juvenile IS’ for ages 3 to 10 years, ‘Adolescent IS’ for 10 to 18 years of age and ‘Adult IS’ for diagnosis at or greater than 18 years of age.




How you can recognize scoliosis?

From the first view you can see that one of the shoulder or pelvis bone is higher than the other one, or you can see that your shoesoles are used differently, but if you want to be really sure, it is good to see a physiotherapist or other professional in this area. They can check your spine and find out if the assumption was correct or not. Based on this diagnosis, level of scoliosis, they recommend you to start the therapy. Among other things (if we are not talking about surgery, special corsets etc.), what can help you is stretching and strengthening your muscles to help your body to improve the spine state.



What exercises are good for me?

All movement what helps to strengthen the muscles around your spine and core are good. Strong muscles help to hold the spine vertebrae in stable position and help to prevent deterioration of the spine. One of the best is Spiral stabilisation exercising.


What is the principle of Spiral Stabilisation Exercising?

This highly effective movement programme is using a unique spiral stabilization of the spine. The whole body’s stabilizing muscles are connected together during optimal coordinated movement creating a dynamic stabilizing muscle corset. Using these muscle chains helps the body develop upward strength creating traction of the spine that relieves pressure on the intervertebral discs and joints and allows for their nutrition, regeneration and treatment. Muscle spirals also allow for optimal spinal movement while aligning the spine into a centralised axis.



How does it work?

Spiral Stabilisation exercises are performed with an elastic cord. The cord allows for extensive movement against a low, but gradually increasing resistance that will activate the muscle chains and create traction of the spine relieving pressure on the intervertebral discs and joints. 



Can I exercise this Spiral Stabilisation Exercising also in case I have no scoliosis?

Spiral Stabilization is curative, preventative and a very versatile method therefore it can be used by everyone who wishes to improve their posture, treat back pain, prevent injuries, maintain good health and well-being or aim for sports conditioning.


For more information, consultation or book the lesson click here.





Inspired by: http://www.spiralstabilization.co.uk, http://xcellmedicalgroup.com/idiopathic-scoliosis-need-know/, http://scoliosisphysiotherapy.com.au/idiopathic-scoliosis/

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